Tae-Hee Lee

Tae-Hee Lee

Main Content

  • Associate Professor of Chemistry and the Huck Institute of the Life Sciences
Office:
230 Chemistry Building
University Park, PA 16802
Email:
(814) 867-2232

Education:

  1. B.S., Sogang University, Seoul, Korea 1993
  2. Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 2004
  3. Post-doc, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2004-2007

Honors and Awards:

  1. NIH Pathway to Independence Award, 2006
  2. Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Award, 2007
  3. Searle Scholar, 2008

Selected Publications:

John Choy and Tae-Hee Lee, Dynamics of nucleosomes at single molecule resolution, Trends. Biochem. Sci. 37 425 (2012)

Ju Yeon Lee and Tae-Hee Lee, Effects of DNA methylation on the structure of nucleosomes, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134 173 (2012)

Ju Yeon Lee, Sijie Wei and Tae-Hee Lee, Effects of histone acetylation by Piccolo NuA4 on the structure of a nucleosome and the interactions between two nucleosomes, J. Biol. Chem. 286 11099 (2011)

Chen-Yu Liu, Mohd Tanvir Qureshi and Tae-Hee Lee, Interaction strengths between the ribosome and tRNA at various steps of translocation, Biophys. J. 100 2201 (2011)

Ravindra Kumar, Vishal Nahine, Padmaja Mishra, Stephen Benkovic and Tae-Hee Lee, Stepwise loading of yeast clamp revealed by ensemble and single-molecule studies, PNAS 107 19736 (2010)

Tae-Hee Lee, Extracting Kinetics Information from Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Data Using Hidden Markov Models, J. Phys. Chem. B 113 11535 (2009)

 

Information:

Single molecule spectroscopic/microscopic method development and applications to biophysics with an emphasis on the role of dynamics in enzyme functions. Methods of interest include single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer, precise localization of macromolecules by fluorescence and light scattering, single photon correlation spectroscopy, and optical trapping. Systems of interest include molecules and assemblies involved in gene transcription and translation.

Single molecule biophysics

Single molecule spectroscopy/microscopy provides ways to monitor sub-population dynamics, thereby yielding valuable information complementing ensemble measurements. High sensitivity imaging devices and several innovative signal processing techniques have boosted popularity of single molecule methods in many fields of science and engineering. A few recent additions of single molecule methods to the field of biophysics include single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer, nanometer (co)localization of single fluorophores, rotational and translational motion tracking of single particles, and single molecule manipulation with optical or magnetic tweezers.

Studying dynamics of molecules is essential in understanding their behavior and function in cells. Studying dynamics of asynchronously moving molecules through a multi-step enzymatic reaction requires capability of monitoring sub-population dynamics, which can be efficiently achieved with various single molecule methods. My research program focuses on the dynamics of molecules involved in several steps of gene transcription and translation in order to understand what roles dynamics of molecules play in the processes. Various single molecule imaging techniques and optical tweezers are utilized to probe and control the dynamics of the molecules involved in the proposed systems. My research program is very much interdisciplinary across physical chemistry, physics, biochemistry, molecular/structural/cellular biology, and nanoscale science/engineering. The goal is to provide i) novel insights into the link between the mechanisms of complex cellular machineries and the fundamental laws of dynamics, and ii) efficient single molecule methods to study and control complex enzymatic reactions.

Positions Available

Biophysics post-doc position openings

I am currently looking for post-doctoral researchers. Individuals trained in biological sciences or experimental physical sciences are strongly encouraged to apply. Enthusiastic scientists trained in other disciplines searching for career opportunities in single molecule biophysics are also welcome to apply. Potential roles in the lab include routine work in cellular/molecular biology, application and/or development of spectroscopic/microscopic techniques to the above described problems.

If interested, please send your CV, including references, to thlee@psu.edu.

Research Interests:

Analytical
  • Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy
  • Method development for single-molecule measurements
  • Biophysical problem-solving based on single-molecule measurements
  • Nanoscale engineering based on single-molecule microscopy

 

Biological

Single molecule biophysics, biochemistry and enzymology

Physical

Single molecule fluorescence and force spectroscopy/microscopy

Spectroscopy

Single molecule spectroscopy and microscopy of biological macromolecular complexes and enzymes