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 A recent assessment by the National Research Council has placed Penn State's Department of Chemistry among the top chemistry departments in the nation.

 

Table 1 contains the results of the 2010 NRC survey of chemistry departments; it also compares the H-index of the Penn State Chemistry Department with other selected departments.

 

Results of the 2010 NRC survey of chemistry departments
Rank 2010 NRC
 Composite Index
Program H-INDEX*
(1988-2008)
1
1-4
Harvard University Chemical Physics  
2  1-5 California Institute of Technology  
3  1-6 Harvard University Chemistry  226
4  1-6 University of California - Berkeley  195
5  3-9 Northwestern University  148
6  4-12 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign  120
7
 5-13 Stanford University  140
8  5-15 Columbia University  116
9  5-14 Massachusetts Institute of Technology  191
10  5-14 Yale University  142
11  7-19 University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill  127
12
 8-22 Pennsylvania State University  121
13  8-24 University of California - Los Angeles  165
14  8-26 University of California - San Francisco  
15  10-29 Georgia Institute of Technology  
16  11-31 University of California - San Diego  
17  11-34 Princeton University  120
18  12-37 University of Texas at Austin  131
19  11-39 Rice University  
20  14-38 University of Chicago  109

 

One additional measure of the excellence of an academic research department is the ability of the faculty members to generate external funds for research support. In a recent report from the National Science Foundation, Academic Research and Development Expenditures: Fiscal Year 2008, Penn State Chemistry placed number eleven in the list of top 100 chemistry departments with the most spending on chemical research and development.

 

NOTE: The H-index, or Hirsch index, has been proposed as a method for measuring the scientific productivity of a researcher or department. The H-index is defined as the number of papers with citation number greater than or equal to H. (See for example PNAS November 15, 2005 vol. 102 no. 46 16569-16572)