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John Asbury promoted to Associate Professor

John Asbury promoted to Associate Professor

John Asbury has been promoted to the rank of associate professor. Promotion to this rank at Penn State "takes place only after a rigorous review of a faculty member's scholarship of teaching and learning; research and creative accomplishments; and service to the University, society, and the profession."

Asbury joined the Penn State Chemistry faculty in 2005. He earned his Ph.D. in 2001 from Emory University.

Carsten Krebs promoted to Professor

Carsten Krebs promoted to Professor

Carsten Krebs has been promoted to the rank of professor. Promotion to this rank at Penn State "takes place only after a rigorous review of a faculty member's scholarship of teaching and learning; research and creative accomplishments; and service to the University, society, and the profession."

Krebs joined the Penn State Chemistry faculty in 2007. He earned his Ph.D. in 1997 from Max Planck Institut für Strahlenchemie in Germany.

Christine Keating promoted to Professor

Christine Keating promoted to Professor

Christine Keating has been promoted to the rank of professor. Promotion to this rank at Penn State "takes place only after a rigorous review of a faculty member's scholarship of teaching and learning; research and creative accomplishments; and service to the University, society, and the profession."

Keating joined the Penn State faculty in 2001. She earned her Ph.D. in 1997 from Penn State University.

Will Noid receives Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award

Will Noid receives Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award

Will Noid, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been selected to receive the 2012 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award.  The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences.  The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program provides an unrestricted research grant of $75,000.

Ben Lear receives 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant

Ben Lear receives 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant

Ben Lear, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been selected to receive a 3M Foundation Non-tenured Faculty Grant.

Sharon Hammes-Schiffer elected member of American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Sharon Hammes-Schiffer elected member of American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Sharon Hammes-Schiffer,  Professor of Chemistry and the Eberly Professor of Biotechnology, has been elected as a member of the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences is an independent policy research center that conducts multidisciplinary studies of complex and emerging problems. The Academy’s elected members are leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business, and public affairs.

For more information regarding this award and Sharon's research, please click here.

Marty Bollinger receives the Palmer Faculty Mentoring Award

Marty Bollinger receives the Palmer Faculty Mentoring Award

Marty Bollinger, Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has been selected to receive the 2012 Howard B. Palmer Faculty Mentoring Award.

The award honors and recognizes outstanding achievement by a faculty member with at least five years of service who effectively guides junior faculty. Howard Palmer was the senior associate dean of The Graduate School from 1984 to 1991.

Kate Masters receives Atherton Award

Kate Masters receives Atherton Award

Kate Masters has been selected to receive the 2012 George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching.  Since becoming a Penn State lecturer in 2004, Katherine Masters has “overhauled” most of her courses’ curricula with the intention of making them as challenging and relevant as possible. Currently, she is developing new theme-based modules for Chem 213H, an honors section of organic chemistry lab, so that, for example, in the food science module, students will carry out the oxidation of green tea to black tea, while in the agricultural science module, students will investigate the volatile organics that come from ripening fruits.

The George W. Atherton award, named after Penn State's seventh president, honors excellence in teaching at the undergraduate level.

Phil Bevilacqua receives C.I. Noll Award

Phil Bevilacqua receives C.I. Noll Award

Phil Bevilacqua, Professor of Chemistry, has been selected to receive the 2011 ECOS C.I. Noll Award for Excellence in Teaching.  The C. I. Noll Award is presented annually to an outstanding faculty member within the Eberly College of Science.  The award is designed to recognize a faculty member who has taken a special interest in students, and who, through their interactions, has had a positive impact on them.

Carsten Krebs receives SBIC Early Career Award

Carsten Krebs receives SBIC Early Career Award

Carsten Krebs, Professor of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has been selected by the Society for Biological Inorganic Chemistry to receive the 2012 Early Career Award. The SBIC Early Career Award is the signature award in the field. It is awarded to the most meritorious scientist (WORLDWIDE) who has completed no more than 15 years of distinguished research in the field of biological inorganic chemistry. The award comes with a $2,000 honorarium, a plaque and will be presented to Carsten before his plenary lecture at the 16th International Conference for Biological Inorganic Chemistry in July 2013 in Grenoble, France.

Lori Van Der Sluys receives Priestley Prize

Lori Van Der Sluys receives Priestley Prize

Lori Van Der Sluys has been selected to receive the 2011 Priestley Prize for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in Chemistry.  The prize will be formally given at the Chemistry Department commencement reception in May.

The Priestley Prize for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in Chemistry is awarded annually to a faculty member in the Chemistry Department for excellence in undergraduate chemistry instruction.

The Priestley Prize was established in 2002 to recognize the best undergraduate teachers in the Chemistry Department as measured by the increase in learning and enthusiasm for the subject by the students in chemistry courses.

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Lasse Jensen selected for ACS HP Outstanding Junior Faculty Award

Lasse Jensen selected for ACS HP Outstanding Junior Faculty Award

Lasse Jensen, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been selected for an ACS HP Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry for 2012.  The ACS COMP HP Outstanding Junior Faculty Award program provides $1,000 to up to four outstanding tenure-track junior faculty members to present their work in COMP symposia at ACS National Meetings. The awards are designed to assist new faculty members in gaining visibility within the COMP community.

Ray Schaak receives Faculty Scholar Medal

Ray Schaak receives Faculty Scholar Medal

Ray Schaak, Professor of Chemistry, has been selected to receive the 2012 Penn State Faculty Scholar Medal in Physical Science. Established in 1980, the award recognizes scholarly or creative excellence represented by a single contribution or a series of contributions around a coherent theme. A committee of faculty peers reviews nominations and recommends candidates to Penn State's president, Rodney Erickson.

Research in the Schaak lab is driven by synthesis – developing new synthetic methodologies that fill critical gaps in the current “toolbox” of techniques available in the solid-state chemistry and nanoscience communities, and applying these new synthetic tools to important problems in both fundamental and applied science.

Scott Phillips named Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow

Scott Phillips named Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow

Scott Phillips, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been selected as a 2012 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.  The Sloan Research program recognizes the achievements of outstanding young scholars in science, mathematics, economics and computer science.

Scott Phillips to receive NSF Career Award

Scott Phillips to receive NSF Career Award

Scott Phillips, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been chosen to receive a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award. CAREER is a Foundation-wide activity that "offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations."

The Phillips group designs and synthesizes reagents that are capable of autonomously detecting trace chemical signals and then providing a highly amplified response.

Dave Allara named Distinguished Professor

Dave Allara named Distinguished Professor

Dave Allara has been named Distinguished Professor of Chemistry.  To find out more about Dave's and his research please visit his faculty page at: http://www.chem.psu.edu/directory/dla3.

Karl Mueller named AAAS Fellow

Karl Mueller named AAAS Fellow

Karl Mueller, Professor of Chemistry, has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  Fellows are recognized for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications.

The research in his group addresses the interfacial chemistry of materials (such as oxide glasses) and environmentally-important solids (including minerals, glasses, and clays).

Lasse Jensen named a Presidential Early Career Award Winner

Lasse Jensen named a Presidential Early Career Award Winner

Lasse Jensen, an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Penn State University, has been selected by President Obama and the National Science Foundation to receive a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) "for addressing fundamental questions relevant to optical spectroscopy of bio- and nano-systems and for exemplary teaching efforts and the dissemination of computational tools to the chemistry community." The PECASE Award, which is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on scientists in the early stages of their careers, is "intended to recognize some of the finest scientists and engineers who show exceptional potential for leadership at the frontiers of scientific knowledge during the twenty-first century." Jensen will receive the award during a ceremony at the White House.

Jensen's research focuses on developing new theoretical and computational tools for addressing important questions relevant to the optical spectroscopy of biological and nano-scale systems. He is particularly interested in understanding how enhanced Raman spectroscopy -- which uses visible light to reveal the structural properties, local interactions, and vibration frequencies of a molecule -- can selectively probe a specific subsystem of a more complex system.

Jensen also studies surface-enhanced Raman scattering, in which a metallic nanostructure can amplify the Raman signal of molecules near a metal surface over a million times. He has used theoretical methods to gain a microscopic understanding of such phenomena. This understanding has provided detailed information not directly available from experiments. It also helps to guide the direction of future experiments.

Jensen previously had been honored in 2010 with the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The CAREER award is the NSF's most prestigious award in support of junior faculty members who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent teaching, and the integration of education and research. In 2005, Jensen was awarded an International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE) young scientist prize. He received an Internalization Fellowship from the Danish Research Agency from 2000 to 2004.

Prior to joining Penn State in June of 2007 as an assistant professor of chemistry, Jensen was a research associate at Northwestern University from 2004 to 2007. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in chemistry at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark in 1998 and 2000, respectively, and a Ph.D. degree in chemistry at Rijksuniversiteit Groningen in the Netherlands in 2004.


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Nick Winograd receives ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry

Nick Winograd receives ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry

Nicholas Winograd, an Evan Pugh Professor of Chemistry at Penn State University, has been honored with an American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry sponsored by the Batelle Memorial Institute. The award recognizes Winograd for his four decades of creative research in surface analysis and mass spectrometry, for his mentoring of nearly 80 Ph.D. students and 35 postdoctoral associates, and for his extensive service to the chemistry community.

Winograd is noted for his ability to merge advanced theoretical principles with novel experimental approaches to create powerful analytical methods. He has performed extensive research on ion-beam modification of oxide materials and he was active in introducing the concept of high-molecular-weight mass spectrometry to the chemistry community. In addition, Winograd and his collaborators were the first researchers to produce molecule-specific images of a single biological cell. The latest groundbreaking experiments from Winograd's lab involve the implementation of molecular depth profiling and three-dimensional chemical imaging.

Winograd has published over 400 research papers in Analytical Chemistry, Physical Review Letters, Science, and many other journals, and he holds five patents. His research papers have been cited over 700 times per year over the last four years, and over 11,000 citations overall. In addition to his teaching and research duties at Penn State, Winograd has served in various consulting positions for a number of private companies, including the Shell Oil Company, Astra Pharmaceutical Company, Precise Technology, and Atom Sciences. He has given invited and distinguished lectures throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia. His professional affiliations include the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, and Phi Lambda Upsilon. He has served on the National Science Foundation Chemistry Advisory Board, the Department of Energy Assessment Panel, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Chemical Sciences Review Panel, and many other advisory boards and panels. He also has served as an editor for the Journal of Trace and Microprobe Techniques, Surface and Interface Analysis, Chemtracts, Vacuum, and many other scientific journals.

Winograd has received awards and honors throughout his career, including an American Vacuum Society Fellow Award in 2002, the Phyllis Johnson Patrick Award from Kansas State University in 1999, the American Microchemical Society Bennedetti-Pichler Award in 1991, the Outstanding Alumnus Award from Case Western Reserve University in 1991, the Akron American Chemical Society Section Award in 1986, a Penn State Faculty Scholar Medal for Outstanding Achievement in 1985, and the Texas Instruments Foundation 1984 Founders' Prize.

Before joining the Penn State faculty in 1979, Winograd was a professor at Purdue University. He earned a doctoral degree at Case Western Reserve University in 1970 and a bachelor's degree at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1967.

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Ray Schaak receives National Fresenius Award

Ray Schaak receives National Fresenius Award

Raymond Schaak, a professor of chemistry at Penn State, has been selected by the American Chemical Society to receive the National Fresenius Award, named in recognition of the eminent chemist Carl Remigius Fresenius and sponsored by Phi Lambda Upsilon, the National Chemistry Honor Society. The award, which was established in 1965, is presented annually to an outstanding young scientist who has attained national recognition in the areas of research, teaching, and/or administration.

Throughout his career, Schaak's research has combined ideas and tools from solid-state chemistry, molecular chemistry, and nanoscience, with the goal of developing new chemical methods to make complex nanoscale solids that could impact such areas as energy, catalysis, optics, and medicine. A key focus of Schaak's research program is studying how nanoscale solids form and using this knowledge to design new materials with important and unusual features. For example, insights into how alloy and semiconductor nanoparticles are generated from chemical precursors have led to the discovery of new classes of magnetic and catalytic nanomaterials.

In 2010, Schaak received an inaugural Scialog Award, sponsored by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement, for his project, "New Chemical Routes for Discovering and Improving Visible-Light Photocatalysts." In 2007, he was honored with a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and a Sloan Research Fellowship. In 2006, he received a DuPont Young Professor Grant, a Beckman Young Investigator Award, and a National Science Foundation Career Award. Schaak has authored more than 80 scientific papers published in international, peer-reviewed journals. He serves as an associate editor for ACS Nano and as an editorial advisory board member for the Journal of Solid State Chemistry. He has presented dozens of invited talks, has served on several National Science Foundation workshop panels, has organized symposia at regional and national scientific meetings, and has served as a co-chair of the awards committee for the American Chemical Society's Division of Inorganic Chemistry.

Before joining Penn State as a faculty member in 2007, Schaak was an assistant professor of chemistry at Texas A&M University from 2003 to 2007. He was a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Chemistry at Princeton University from 2001 to 2003. Schaak earned a doctoral degree in chemistry in 2001 at Penn State and a bachelor's degree in chemistry at Lebanon Valley College in 1998.

 

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