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Whitmore Renovation Photos

Below are some photos of the recently renovated Whitmore Labs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chemistry Wins Departmental Safety Competition at 2016 Safety Olympics

Chemistry Wins Departmental Safety Competition at 2016 Safety Olympics

Congratulations to the Chemistry Safety Olympics teams from the Badding, Cremer, Keating, and Sen groups who together led Chemistry to win the Departmental Safety Award at the 2nd annual Safety Olympics held at the Millennium Science Complex on September 8th, 2016.  Our teams out-competed other groups of three teams from Materials Science and Engineering, Physics, and Electrical Engineering at the Olympics, winning the overall competition by excelling in five events:

Scavenger Hunt - finding safety errors in a laboratory during a lab inspection
Speed sorting - sorting chemicals into their hazard classifications for safe storage (acids, bases, flammables, oxidizers)
Safety Taboo - like the game Taboo but about safety topics
Safety Trivia - answering serious questions about safety that are contained in EH&S training videos
Speed Gowning - putting on the suits used in the cleanroom as fast a possible

In recognition of the safety expertise of our four teams, the Department received a handsome trophy that was made possible with funds from PPG.  This trophy is on display in 101 Chemistry so we can fully exercise our bragging rights.  We can keep it only for one year unless of course we win again next year!

Tae-Hee Lee's August ACS Presentation covered by C&EN Magazine

Tae-Hee Lee's August ACS Presentation covered by C&EN Magazine

It takes a lot of packaging to squeeze DNA into the nucleus of a cell. The DNA in our chromosomes is packaged into nucleosomes, which consist of about 150 DNA base pairs wrapped around eight-protein spools called histones.

http://acsmeetings.cenmag.org/method-watches-nucleosomes-open-and-close/

Kyra Murrell selected for 2016 SciFinder Future Leaders Program

Kyra Murrell selected for 2016 SciFinder Future Leaders Program

Kyra Murrell has been selected to participate in the 2016 SciFinder Future Leaders Program this August. Kyra is one of 26 Ph.D. students and postdoctoral researchers from the U.S. and around the world who will attend the program. It includes a week of professional development and networking opportunities in Columbus, Ohio, followed by attendance of the 252nd ACS National Meeting & Exposition. Kyra is giving an oral presentation on her current research at the ACS meeting.

http://www.cas.org/products/scifinder/futureleaders

Spring 2016 Chemistry Undergraduate Commencement Reception Scholarship Award Recipients

Steven Spirk received the L. Peter Gold Scholarship Award presented by Dr. Joe Keiser

Stephen Spirk, Joe Keiser

After receiving his doctorate from Harvard, Peter Gold joined the faculty at Penn State in 1965.  Over the next 35 years, he taught hundreds of students physical chemistry.  Sadly, Dr. Gold passed away in 2002.  Former students, friends and family established a scholarship in his memory.  Because he acted as liaison to chemistry faculty at other Penn State campuses for many years, this scholarship is presented annually to an outstanding chemistry student from these campuses. 


Ailiena Maggiolo received the Peter Craig Breen Scholarship Award presented by Dr. Amie Boal

Ailiena Maggiolo, Amie Boal

Peter Breen enrolled at Penn State in 2010 as a Braddock Scholar and Schreyer’s Scholar in the Eberly College of Science, majoring in chemistry.  During his first semester, he took honors chemistry and decided that he wanted to do research in a chemistry laboratory.  What began as a freshman research project led to computational chemistry research in RNA and bioinformatics that continued in the Bevilacqua Lab throughout Peter’s time as an undergraduate student.

Planning to continue his research in bioinformatics, Peter was accepted into three Ph.D. programs before he died in March 2014.  Penn State conferred a B.S. degree in Chemistry with honors (posthumously) to Peter in May 2014. 

To honor the life of Peter Craig Breen, this memorial award was established in 2015 by family and friends with the hope that his smile and kind, gentle spirit will live on as part of the Penn State family.  

 

 

 

Steve Aro places 2nd at the PPG Pitch Competition

Steve Aro places 2nd at the PPG Pitch Competition

Steve Aro, a chemistry graduate student and member of the Badding lab, placed 2nd out of more than 40 competitors in the PPG Pitch Competition held at the Millennium Café last month.  The annual competition challenges graduate students for all science disciplines to sell their research in under two minutes.

Paul Cremer receives 2016 ANACHEM award

Paul Cremer receives 2016 ANACHEM award

The ANACHEM Award was established in 1953 and is presented annually to an outstanding analytical chemist based on activities in teaching, research, administration or other activity which has advanced the art and science of the field. The Award was presented as a part of the Anachem Conference through 1972. After 1972, the ANACHEM Award has been presented at the national meeting presented by FACSS as a part of a special symposium comprising a group of invited speakers. The Annual ANACHEM Award is currently presented at the annual SciX Meeting.

http://www.scixconference.org/awards/anachem-award

Cremer was also interviewed by Spectroscopyonline.com regarding his research:

http://www.spectroscopyonline.com/spectroscopy-interface

 

 

Erica Frankel awarded the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Graduate Fellowship

Erica Frankel awarded the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Graduate Fellowship

Erica Frankel (co-advised by Philip Bevilacqua and Chris Keating) was awarded the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Graduate Fellowship for the 2016-17 academic year. Her research is centered on investigating the physical means that could have aided in the emergence of life on the early Earth using the localization of progenitor molecules for the improvement of RNA catalysis. 

Ben Lear promoted to Associate Professor

Ben Lear promoted to Associate Professor

Ben Lear has been promoted to the rank of associate professor. Promotion to this rank at Penn State "takes place only after a rigorous review of a faculty member's scholarship of teaching and learning; research and creative accomplishments; and service to the University, society, and the profession."

Ben joined the Penn State Chemistry faculty in 2010.  He earned his Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of California, San Diego.

Alex Radosevich promoted to Associate Professor

Alex Radosevich promoted to Associate Professor

Alex Radosevich has been promoted to the rank of associate professor. Promotion to this rank at Penn State "takes place only after a rigorous review of a faculty member's scholarship of teaching and learning; research and creative accomplishments; and service to the University, society, and the profession."

Alex joined the Penn State Chemistry faculty in 2010.  He earned his Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of California, Berkeley.

Badding Group Publishes in the journal Advanced Materials

Badding Group Publishes in the journal Advanced Materials

Under Pressure: New technique could make large, flexible solar panels more feasible

A new, high-pressure technique may allow the production of huge sheets of thin-film silicon semiconductors at low temperatures in simple reactors at a fraction of the size and cost of current technology. A paper describing the research by scientists at Penn State University appears May 13, 2016 in the journal Advanced Materials. http://science.psu.edu/news-and-events/2016-news/Badding5-2016

Booker & Boal paper continues to garner press coverage

The structure of a bacterial RNA-binding protein has been determined in the act of modifying a molecule of RNA -- an achievement that provides researchers with a unique view of the protein's function in action and could lead to clues that would help in the fight against the development of antibiotic-resistant infections.

Sample news clippings resulting from the press release:

“Caught in the act: 3D structure on an RNA-modifying protein determined in action”

April 21, 2016 - May 4, 2016

Scicasts - April 22, 2016

https://scicasts.com/proteomics/2035-structural-genomics/10998-3-d-structure-of-an-rnamodifying-protein-determined-in-action/

Latest Technology - April 23, 2016

http://latesttechnology.space/caught-in-the-act-3d-structure-of-an-rna-modifying-proteindetermined-in-action/

MountainsDreams - April 24, 2016

http://www.mountainsdreams.com/2016/04/24/caught-in-a-act-3d-structure-of-an-rna-modifyingprotein-dynamic-in-action/

Phys.org - April 21, 2016

http://phys.org/news/2016-04-caught-d-rna-modifying-protein-action.html

News Medical - April 22, 2016

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20160422/Researchers-determine-3-D-structure-of-RlmNprotein-from-bacteria.aspx

ScienceDaily - April 21, 2016

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160421114608.htm

MNT - April 22, 2016

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/309446.php

tryhealthtips.com - April 23, 2016

http://tryhealthtips.com/caught-in-the-act-3d-structure-of-an-rna-modifying-protein-determined-inaction/

Booker & Boal published in the current issue of Science

Booker & Boal published in the current issue of Science

From ECOS http://science.psu.edu/news-and-events/2016-news/BookerBoal4-2016

The structure of a bacterial RNA-binding protein has been determined in the act of modifying a molecule of RNA -- an achievement that provides researchers with a unique view of the protein's function in action and could lead to clues that would help in the fight against the development of antibiotic-resistant infections.  Complete paper published in the current issue of the journal Science.

 

 

 

NSF Graduate Fellowship Program Results for 2016

The awardees and honorable mentions for the NSF Graduate Fellowship Program for 2016 have been announced.  Our department is proud to display the list of our graduate students who won an award or got an honorable mention:

Alicia Altemose (Honorable Mention)
Nicole Famularo (NSF Graduate Fellow)
Julie Fenton (Honorable Mention)
Jared Mondschein (Honorable Mention)
Katheryn Penrod (Honorable Mention)
Hannah Rose (Honorable Mention)

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship program recognized and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research based Master's and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.
Phil Bevilacqua is getting students to 'flip' over Chemistry

Phil Bevilacqua is getting students to 'flip' over Chemistry

Phil Bevilacqua is combining IT with flipped classroom techniques to better engage students in general chemistry.  To read the full article please go to "Getting students to 'flip' over chemistry."

Bratoljub Milosavljevic receives Priestley Prize

Bratoljub Milosavljevic receives Priestley Prize

Bratoljub Milosavljevic has been selected to receive the 2015 Priestley Prize for Outstanding Teaching in Chemistry.

The prize will be formally given at the Chemistry Department commencement reception in May.

The Priestley Prize for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in Chemistry is awarded annually to a faculty member in the Chemistry Department for excellence in undergraduate chemistry instruction as measured by the increase in learning and enthusiasm for the subject.

The Priestley Prize was established in 2002 to recognize the best undergraduate teachers in the Chemistry Department as measured by the increase in learning and enthusiasm for the subject by the students in chemistry courses.

Ed O'Brien receives NSF Career Award

Ed O'Brien receives NSF Career Award

Ed O'Brien, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been selected to receive a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award. CAREER is a Foundation-wide activity that "offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations."

Research in the O'Brien addresses fundamental questions regarding molecular and cellular processes in chemistry and biology.

Scott Phillips receives Benkovic Early Career Professorship

Scott Phillips receives Benkovic Early Career Professorship

Scott Phillips, an associate professor of chemistry at Penn State University and holder of the Lou Martarano Career Development Professorship, has been honored with the inaugural Stephen and Patricia Benkovic Early Career Professorship. Stephen J. Benkovic, an Evan Pugh Professor of Chemistry and Holder of the Eberly Family Chair in Chemistry at Penn State University, and Patricia Benkovic, a research associate in chemistry at Penn State, established the professorship to support outstanding early career faculty in the Penn State Eberly College of Science. The professorship offers early recognition for outstanding accomplishments and provides financial support to promising young faculty members to encourage establishing a commitment to teaching and explore new areas of research.

Phillips focuses his research on organic and environmental chemistry, the design and synthesis of molecules with unique functions, analytical and bioanalytical chemistry, and materials chemistry. In one project, Phillips is developing materials that respond to external signals by changing shape, function, and/or surface properties. Phillips also is working on a project in which he uses organic chemistry to create diagnostic devices that provide all the functions typically obtained with laboratory instruments, but that use only organic reactions. These systems may be useful in applications that require portable and inexpensive devices for detecting disease or pollution; for example, in the developing world and in hospital emergency rooms. A second program in this area focuses on reaction networks that are self-perpetuating, the simplest of which is an autocatalytic reaction, in which a molecule makes more of itself. Phillips plans to expand autocatalytic behavior into more complex reaction networks, with a goal of developing systems that provide useful functions and byproducts.

Phillips's previous awards include being named an Emerging Investigator by the journals Analytical Methods and Polymer Chemistry in 2015, and the journal Chemical Communications in 2014. He was awarded the Arthur F. Findeis Award for Achievement by a Young Analytical Scientist in 2015, the Eli Lilly and Company Young Investigator Award in Analytical Chemistry in 2013, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in 2012, and a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation (NSF), also in 2012. He was honored with three 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Awards in 2010, 2011, and 2012, and he received a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award from the United States Department of Defense in 2010. In that same year, he won an Outstanding Professor in Chemistry award from the honor society Alpha Chi Sigma. In 2009, Phillips won a Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award and a research award from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. In that same year, he also won a Beckman Young Investigator Award, a Thieme Chemistry Journal Award, and a Penn State Eberly College of Science Dean's Climate and Diversity Award. In 2008, he won a New Faculty Award from The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation.

Prior to joining the Penn State faculty in 2008, Phillips worked from 2004 to 2008 as a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University, where he developed new materials and detection platforms for use in drug development. He also synthesized chemical compounds with anticancer properties from marine organisms. Phillips earned a doctoral degree in chemistry at the University of California at Berkeley in 2004. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry at the California State University in San Bernardino in 1999.


[ S. J. S. ]

Ray Schaak selected to receive ACS Inorganic Nanoscience Award

Ray Schaak selected to receive ACS Inorganic Nanoscience Award

Ray Schaak has been selected as the 2016 winner of the ACS Inorganic Nanoscience Award. The award is given annually to one chemist under the age of 45.  The award recognizes sustained excellence, dedication, and perseverance in research and service in the area of inorganic nanoscience.

Prof. Christine Keating: Simple physical mechanism for assembly and disassembly of structures inside cells is identified

Prof. Christine Keating: Simple physical mechanism for assembly and disassembly of structures inside cells is identified

For the first time, scientists have demonstrated a simple charge-based mechanism for regulating the formation and dissolution of liquid-like structures that lack outer membranes inside cells. The research provides a first step in deciphering how these poorly-understood structures function in the cell and how they may have evolved. The research, conducted by Penn State University scientists, will appear December 21, 2015, as an advance online publication of the journal, Nature Chemistry.

"Cells contain many of these liquid-like structures that are in some ways conceptually similar to droplets of oil in water," said Christine Keating, professor of chemistry at Penn State University. "The structures, which we call liquid organelles, often appear and disappear inside cells. We were able to replicate this process in a biologically-reasonable way in the lab by controlling the electrostatic charge of the molecules that form our  synthetic liquid organelles. We used tools that the cell itself might use, giving us the first clues about how the process may occur in nature."

"The assumption is that these liquid organelles compartmentalize molecules like RNAs and proteins in order to speed up reactions inside cells," said William Aumiller, a graduate student at Penn State at the time the research was conducted. "This field is very new and there are likely many different mechanisms by which liquid organelles form in cells, so exploring fundamental questions like 'what are the minimum requirements to make these structures come and go as they do in the cell' is very important."

The researchers created synthetic liquid organelles by combining, in a solution, negatively charged RNA molecules with positively-charged short peptides -- chains of amino acids similar to, but smaller than, proteins. Because the two molecules have opposite charges, the News Christine Keating 12-2015 page 2 of 2
RNAs and peptides are attracted to one another and self-assemble into droplets that simulate liquid organelles.

The researchers then adjusted the charge of the peptide molecules in the synthetic liquid organelles by using common enzymes -- proteins that catalyze specific reactions in a cell. They used one type of enzyme, called a kinase, to add phosphate groups -- negatively-charged chemical components -- to the peptides to neutralize their positive charge. Neutralizing the peptides in this manner caused the synthetic liquid organelles to break apart. The scientists then reversed this process and the synthetic liquid organelles reformed by adding another type of enzyme, called a phosphatase, which removed the phosphate group from the peptides, reestablishing their positive charge.

"All sorts of reactions in cells are controlled by modifying proteins with kinases and phosphatases," said Keating. "As chemists, we were thinking about the most basic mechanisms that could be involved in the formation of these liquid organelles, and it's reasonable to think that this is one mechanism that cells might use. Now, we can use our new system to study these liquid-like structures and how they may have evolved."

The research was supported by the National Science Foundation (grant MCB-1244180).

[ Sam Sholtis ]

CONTACTS
Christine Keating: keating@chem.psu.edu, (+1) 814-863-7832
Barbara Kennedy (PIO): science@psu.edu, (+1) 814-863-4682

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